Technology has changed many things, and the medical field is no different. Many patients are now looking for assistance with simple medical problems online, which has caused more people to turn to telemedicine for certain problems. However, some California doctors may have concerns about the issue of liability in this type of medical care and whether it could increase the need for doctor license defense. 

Direct-to-consumer medicine is increasing in popularity, but what happens if there is a problem? Can a doctor helping a patient online, through chats or video conferencing, be liable for issues such as misdiagnosis? A recent study that looked at medical malpractice cases filed in just one month in 2018 found that of the 551 cases, zero were related to telemedicine.

Medical professionals have to provide care that meets a certain standard, but that can be difficult to do online. However, the low rate of malpractice cases in telemedicine may have more to do with the expectations of patients and the low-risk nature of the cases teledoctors take. For example, telemedicine typically involves less complex issues, such as diagnosing a minor skin problem or prescribing medicine for a cough. Often, medicines prescribed are common and low-risk.

When there is a problem with the medical care a patient received, whether it was online or in person, it can cause complications for a California doctor. Whether there is a formal malpractice claim filed or a medical professional simply wants to be prepared, it may help to discuss concerns with an attorney experienced in doctor license defense. Doctors of all kinds have the right to fight for their professional reputation and their livelihood.