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Complaints may lead to veterinary license revocation

| Sep 1, 2020 | Veterinary license defense |

Veterinarians face numerous challenges in their jobs. They must not only meet the standard of care when treating animals but also field complaints from unsatisfied pet owners. Many of these complaints are unjustified, arising when someone’s beloved pet has an unfavorable outcome or prognosis. Other complaints, however, are valid reports of veterinary malpractice.

Either way, a veterinarian who receives multiple complaints from their clients may face serious consequences, including the suspension or revocation of their veterinary license. This is what happened recently to a California veterinarian after the state received complaints from four of his clients.

Multiple complaints, an investigation and a revocation

The California Veterinary Medical Board received complaints from four clients of a Mountain View veterinarian. After investigating the complaints, the board found no fewer than 53 instances of misconduct. These included:

  • Prescription errors
  • Failure to provide accurate diagnosis
  • Errors in treatment
  • Lack of accurate documentation
  • Unlawful operation of a pharmacy

After an administrative hearing, the board decided to revoke the man’s veterinarian license and his premises license, which allowed him to operate a veterinary facility.

All veterinarians must protect their licenses

This case is not yet over. The vet has filed an appeal, claiming that the allegations are erroneous and that his license revocation is unjust. It is possible that a higher administrative court will overturn the lower court’s ruling.

However, this case should serve as a warning to all veterinarians and veterinary technicians. The Veterinary Medical Board takes complaints very seriously and will not hesitate to enact punitive measures. It is critical for anyone in the veterinary field who holds a professional license to adhere to state regulations and meet the established standard of veterinary care. That said, if an allegation of misconduct does arise, veterinarians and vet techs have the right to mount a strong defense to protect their licenses.